Sloan and artist Norman Rockwell

Sloan pre-dates Norman Rockwell, they both satirise modern life in America during their relevant periods. However, Rockwell focuses very much on middle America, whereas Sloan is looking at the working classes. They both share an incredible eye for detail and observation of life.

Anonymous visitor contribution.

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People watching

It must have been very cold! Sloan loves people watching and observes every detail that is happening around him.

Anonymous visitor contribution.

If you would like to share a comment or viewpoint of your own, please do get in touch.

Social observation: visitor response to the display

Wonderful, highly skilled and entertaining social observation. I laughed out loud at some. Also appreciated the fascinating depiction of New York life.

Visitor contribution, by CS. 

If you would like to share a comment or viewpoint of your own, please do get in touch.

 

Social Circle

I get the overall impression that Sloan was intrigued by the lives and goings-on of people outside of his social circle.

There is a feeling of great empathy and lots of humour.

I love it!

Visitor contribution, by Russ B. 

If you would like to share a comment or viewpoint of your own, please do get in touch.

A few thoughts from a visitor

Sloan describes (in his diary of 1906) Lower East Side streets fill of healthy, happy children.

He signed the women’s page – from his New York City Life series – later on.

A visitor’s interpretation of John Sloan’s ‘New York City Life’ prints on display in the Barber’s current exhibition. Author wishes to remain anonymous. If you would like to share a comment or viewpoint of your own, please do get in touch.

Class

Sloan explores the social issues of importance within the 19th / 20th century of class, power, struggle and lifestyles. Through etchings and foreboding lines, shapes and form, Sloan exemplifies the social differences and draws from humorous origins to criticise or contrast the present day’s political correctness.

A visitor’s interpretation of John Sloan’s ‘New York City Life’ prints on display in the Barber’s current exhibition. Author wishes to remain anonymous. If you would like to share a comment or viewpoint of your own, please do get in touch.